David Ley is now being compensated by porn industry giant xHamster to promote its websites and convince users that porn addiction and sex addiction are myths!

David Ley is the author of The Myth of Sex Addiction and Ethical Porn for Dicks. He has written 30 or so blog posts attacking and dismissing NoFap, porn addiction, sex addiction, porn-induced sexual dysfunctions and porn’s effects on relationships David Ley chronically asserts that porn use is harmless and if someone develops problems it’s because they had “other issues”. TV shows, magazines, websites too often turn to Ley as an “authority” on porn addiction and porn’s effects because the medical researchers – who would give an accurate picture of the state of internet addiction research – generally aren’t focused on internet porn specifically. Nor are they as readily available as eager Dr. Ley. He therefore gets to shape the debate in the media despite his utter lack of education in the neuroscience of addiction and sexual conditioning, and having never published any original research.

David Ley and his close ally Nicole Prause often work in tandem, with both equally cited as “the experts,” while actual top addiction neuroscientists, who have published highly respected studies on porn users (Voon, Kraus, Potenza, Brand, Laier, Hajela, Kuhn, Gallinat, Klucken, Seok, Sohn, Gola, Banca, etc.), are omitted. Neither Ley nor Prause are affiliated with any university, yet some journalists, perhaps influenced by Prause’s potent media services, mysteriously prefer both over the top neuroscientists at Yale University, Cambridge University, University of Duisburg-Essen, and the Max Planck Institute. Go figure.

Conflicts of interest (COI) are nothing new for David Ley. Lawyers pay him good money to “debunk” sex & porn addiction; he sells books “debunking” sex & porn addiction; he collects speaking fees for “debunking” sex & porn addiction. All this while harassing and defaming individuals and organizations who speak up about the possible negative effects of internet porn. For years Ley and his close ally Nicole Prause have conspired overtly and behind the scenes, manipulating journalists, sharing talking points, emailing governing bodies, and even influencing the peer-reviewed process in dubious ways (these 2 pages provide extensive documentation of said behaviors: page 1, page 2).

However, Ley officially has now crossed the line. In a blatant financial conflict of interest, David Ley is being compensated by porn industry giant xHamster to promote their websites (i.e. StripChat) and to convince users that porn addiction and sex addiction are myths! Notice how Ley is going to tell xHamster customers what “medical studies truly say about porn, camming and sexuality”:

Will Ley tell xHamster customers that every study ever published on males (about 65) links more porn to less sexual and relation satisfaction? Will Ley tell them that all 44 neurological studies on porn users/sex addicts report brain changes seen in drug addicts? Will he inform his audience that 50% of porn users report escalating to material they previously found uninteresting or disgusting? Somehow I doubt it.

Specifically, David Ley and the newly formed Sexual Health Alliance (SHA) have partnered with a xHamster website (Strip-Chat). See “Stripchat aligns with Sexual Health Alliance to stroke your anxious porn-centric brain.” In their promotional tweet we are promised a slate of SHA brain experts to soothe users “porn anxiety” and “shame” (Ley and other SHA “experts” are light years away from being brain experts).

The fledgling Sexual health Alliance (SHA) advisory board includes David Ley and two other RealYourBrainOnPorn.com “experts” (Justin Lehmiller and Chris Donaghue). RealYBOP is a group of openly pro-porn, self-proclaimed “experts” headed by Nicole Prause. This group is currently engaged in illegal trademark infringement and squatting directed toward the legitimate YBOP. Put simply, those trying to silence YBOP are also being paid by the porn industry to promote its/their businesses, and assure users that porn and cam sites cause no problems. (Note: Nicole Prause has close, public ties to the porn industry as documented on this page.)

The official StripChat Twitter account reveals the true reason for paying SHA “experts”: to soothe their anxieties to prevent the loss of paying customers. The SHA will accomplish this by “talking about the latest research on sex, camming and addiction,” that is, cherry picking the work done by “their” researchers. Will Ley/SHA mention that hundreds of studies link porn use to myriad negative effects?

In this article, Ley dismisses his compensated promotion of the porn industry:

Granted, sexual health professionals partnering directly with commercial porn platforms face some potential downsides, particularly for those who’d like to present themselves as completely unbiased. “I fully anticipate [anti-porn advocates] to all scream, ‘Oh, look, see, David Ley is working for porn,’” says Ley, whose name is routinely mentioned with disdain in anti-masturbation communities like NoFap.

But even if his work with Stripchat will undoubtedly provide fodder to anyone eager to write him off as biased or in the pocket of the porn lobby, for Ley, that tradeoff is worth it. “If we want to help [anxious porn consumers], we have to go to them,” he says. “And this is how we do that.”

Biased? Ley reminds us of the infamous tobacco doctors, and the Sexual health Alliance reminds us of the Tobacco Institute.

While being paid by the porn industry is the most egregious conflict of interest (COI), Ley has a few more.

Conflict of Interest #2 David Ley is being paid to debunk porn and sex addiction. At the end of this Psychology Today blog post Ley advertises his services:

“Disclosure: David Ley has provided testimony in legal cases involving claims of sex addiction.”

In 2019 David Ley’s new website offered his well-compensated “debunking” services:

David J. Ley, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist and AASECT-certified supervisor of sex therapy, based in Albuquerque, NM. He has provided expert witness and forensic testimony in a number of cases around the United States. Dr. Ley is regarded as an expert in debunking claims of sexual addiction, and has been certified as an expert witness on this topic. He has testified in state and federal courts.

Contact him to obtain his fee schedule and arrange an appointment to discuss your interest.

Conflict of Interest #3: Ley makes money selling two books that deny sex and porn addiction (“The Myth of Sex Addiction,” 2012 and “Ethical Porn for Dicks,” 2016). Pornhub (which is owned by porn giant MindGeek) is one of the five back-cover endorsements listed for Ley’s 2016 book about porn:

Note: PornHub was the second Twitter account to retweet RealYBOP’s initial tweet announcing its “expert” (pro-porn) website, suggesting a coordinated effort between PornHub and the RealYBOP experts. Wow!

Conflict of Interest #4: Finally, David Ley makes money via CEU seminars, where he promotes the addiction-deniers’ ideology set forth in his two books (which recklessly(?) ignore dozens of studies and the significance of the new Compulsive Sexual Behavior Disorder diagnosis in the World Health Organization’s diagnostic manual). Ley is compensated for his many talks featuring his biased views on porn use. In this 2019 presentation Ley appears to support and promote adolescent porn use: Developing Positive Sexuality and Responsible Pornography Use in Adolescents.

This is just the tip of the iceberg. Peruse these pages for many more incidents involving David Ley:


 

Update: Short article takes a swipe at David Ley & other RealYBOP experts teaming up with xHamster/StripChat

Stripchat Now Offering Free Sex Therapy

You’ve heard of Snapchat. But have you heard of Stripchat?

The site, which is basically a strip club through the lens of a web camera, recently conducted an internal survey among its users. Forty-two percent of users report experiencing “some” anxiety about the time they spent on the site. Eleven percent of users say they experience “frequent or constant” anxiety.

Furthermore, 29 percent of married users report that they are worried their streaming constituted cheating, while 31 percent of married users revealed that Stripchat caused problems in their relationships.

Stripchat takes these numbers seriously: “Anxiety and relationship stress are serious issues,” they acknowledge. “Camming should be a source of pleasure and refuge from the stress of daily life—not something that adds to it. That’s why Stripchat is making a commitment to be a leader in mental and emotional well-being for its users.”

Thus, Stripchat announced its partnership with the Sexual Health Alliance “to bring clinical psychologists, sex researchers and relationship therapists onto its global cam platform to answer questions about sex addiction and online infidelity” as of August 1. It will also discuss “ways these can be balanced in your life.”

Some of these questions include the following:

  • “Is camming cheating?”
  • “Can you fall in love with a cam model?”
  • “Is porn addictive?”

Given that Dr. David Ley, who led the August 1 session, authored a book entitled The Myth of Sex Addiction, it seems plausible that the answer to the latter question will be a resounding “no.”

The porn industry makes more than the NFL, NBA, and MLB combined. It also makes more than NBC, CBS, and ABC combined. Rumor has it that the porn industry as a whole nets between $6 and $97 billion annually. So Stripchat convincing its users that porn may be addictive and hurtful to their relationships is not exactly what some might call a good business model.

Max Bennett, the Vice President of News Media at Stripchat, commented that the initial August 1 session was “a chance for them to get past some of the myths and stigma surrounding porn, and talk to an expert what science actually says.”

But what does the science really say?

For starters, using pornography shrinks the grey matter in the brain, the Max Planck Institute reports. It makes men more likely to suffer from erectile dysfunction. It is also known to cause mental health issues in men and women, including anxiety, depression, and body image issues.

It’s not surprising that one in three Stripchat users report that Stripchat caused problems in their relationships. People who use porn love their partner less and are more sexually dissatisfied. Pornography has also been shown to increase marital infidelity by 300 percent.

So even if Stripchat’s experts find that porn is not addictive and camming is not cheating, there are still plenty of other questions that the so-called sexuality experts need to answer. Max Bennet notes that “the outside world doesn’t always accept” people who use pornography. Maybe there is a reason for this sentiment.

According to “science,” if Stripchat truly wants to be a leader in mental and emotional well-being for its users, it would advise them to quit stripchatting altogether.

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